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The Earth is the ground upon which we all stand, together in our differences.  It is an ever-shifting, politicized landscape of borders, exclusions and omissions, as well as shared terrain under pressing physical assault. This multigenerational and multicultural group of artists explore the reality of a shared planet that is humanity’s most divided territory and damaged common ground.

Curated by Suvan Geer and Sandra Mueller

October 3 - November 14, 2020

Kim Abeles

Mariona Barkus

Sharon Barnes

Pilar Castillo

Danielle Eubank

Samantha Fields

Eloisa Guanlao

Ann Isolde

Sant Khalsa

Meg Madison

Kaoru Mansour

Maryrose C. Mendoza

Sandra Mueller

Naida Osline

Pamela J. Peters

Sheila Pinkel

Sinan Leong Revell

She Votes/ Bonnie J. Smith

Stitch in Time/ Suvan Geer

Linda Vallejo

Gail Werner

 
 

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Kim Abeles

The hundred+ sky photographs for Shared Skies were collected through my journeys, from artists who participated while traveling, and international acquaintances through social media. Each sky is identified with the location and the name of the person who took the photograph and represent all seven continents plus the Arctic. For participating, each photographer was given an archival print that included their sky with twelve others.

 

As people look toward the sky each morning, through the day or each night, the “shared skies” speak to our connections. In a global sense, we can imagine an interrelatedness through a seamless sky and observe the effects of our environmental choices. From the Salt Flats of Bolivia to Grand Forks in the United States, and Maasai Mara, Kenya to Pine Ridge, Oglala Sioux Tribe, our skies portray the connected parts of our place on this earth.

Kim Abeles is an artist whose artworks explore biography, geography, feminism, and the environment. Her work speaks to society, science literacy, and civic engagement, creating projects with science and natural history museums, health departments, air pollution control agencies, National Park Service, and non-profits. In 1987, she innovated a method to create images from the smog in the air, and Smog Collectors brought her work to national and international attention. In 2019, she worked with Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow to create smog portraits of world leaders with quotes from climate summits. The National Endowment for the Arts funded two recent projects: a residency at the Institute of Forest Genetics where she focused on Resilience; and, Valises for Camp Ground: Arts, Corrections, and Fire Management in the Santa Monica Mountains in collaboration with Camp 13, a group of female prison inmates who fight wildfires. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation and Pollack-Krasner Foundation. Her work is in forty public collections including MOCA, LACMA, Berkeley Art Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and National Geospatial Intelligence Agency. Her process documents are archived at the Center for Art + Environment.

Legend of Shared Skies, 2012-2014

Archival ultrachrome prints of international skies

Identified by location and photographer

56" x 16”

$1200

Legend of Shared Skies, 2012-2014

Archival ultrachrome prints of international skies

Identified by location and photographer

56" x 16”

$1200

Purchase Inquiry

Mariona Barkus

Earth is currently littered with more than a quarter million metric ton of highly radioactive waste. Over 90,000 metric tons are in the United States, stored at 121 sites in 35 states. “Monument For A Nuclear Dump” was inspired by Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository’s search for a system of surface markers to warn of its planned lethal underground cache for hundreds of thousands of years. A “toilet paper roll” encapsulating 32 years of newspaper clippings mimics the folly of this entombment while documenting ubiquitous nuclear waste proliferation. When I created this print in 1995, only the United States was planning an underground nuclear waste repository. Today, countries around the world subscribe to the “best practice” of isolating nuclear waste in deep geological repositories, which will be permanently sealed. But this “best practice” assumes a rather static geology instead of the living, breathing, shifting common ground that is our earth. 

Mariona Barkus has shown her work in solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States as well as internationally. Barkus’ work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Getty Research Institute, UCLA, Franklin Furnace Collection at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Yale University Art Museum, Long Beach Museum, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Carnegie-Mellon University, UC Berkeley, Houston Contemporary Art Museum, and Eastern Washington University among others. Her work has been reviewed in numerous catalogues and periodicals including The Los Angeles Times and Artweek. Some of the books featuring her work are Crossing Over: Feminism and Art of Social Concern by Arlene Raven; Other Visions, Other Voices by Paul Von Blum with a foreword by Lucy Lippard; Artists’ Books: A Critical Anthology and Sourcebook by The Visual Studies Workshop; From Site to Vision: the Woman’s Building in Contemporary Culture, edited by Sondra Hale and Terry Wolverton, and most recently, American Artists Against War 1935—2010 by David McCarthy, University of California Press.

Monument for A Nuclear Dump Installation

Archival digital print & nuclear waste newspaper clippings

20” x 14" print; 9.25” x 662' roll

$500 print only

Purchase Inquiry

Sharon Barnes

My suspended work Milkman’s Flight was inspired by Toni Morrison’s book, Song of Solomon. Morrison wove a story in which the conflicted Milkman would finally know his forefather’s names and the inherited magic to free one’s mind and fly. The slave trade severed the memories of countless lineages and displaced African peoples from an entire continent. My work explores connections to earth and memory that are vital to the restoration of peace within each individual and among all people, as we seek to connect with one another on common ground.

Sharon Barnes is an inter-disciplinary Los Angeles-based artist born in Sacramento, CA, and raised in Los Angeles.  She studied at Otis College of Art & Design where she recently returned to complete her MFA in Fine Arts, and previously earned a BA in Television & Film from CSULA.  Barnes has exhibited nationally and internationally, including group shows at the California African American Museum, the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Aqua Art Miami, the Los Angeles Tom Bradley Airport and a site installation at the Arco Chato in the Republic of Panama. She has completed residencies at the Ox-Bow School of Art & Artist Residency in Saugatuck, MI and the Spelman College Art Colony at Taller Portobelo in Panama.  Barnes’ work is in the permanent collection of the UCLA Ralph Bunche Center for African American Studies, as well as private and business collections.

Milkman's Flight

Suspended sculpture

72" x 72" x 3"

$7000

Purchase Inquiry

Pilar Castillo

Designed as a ‘hyper-real’ counterfeit, the PASSPORT booklet mimics the structure and subverts the content of the official document. This counterfeit travel document aims to confront the institutional narrative, question its authenticity, and serve as a record of protest and indignation. This work is centered within the context of ‘decolonizing design,’ as a practice in redefining how we interpret government narratives, and to consider the formats in which land is claimed and people discarded. 

PASSPORT revisits the political systems imposed by the U.S. government to exploit immigrants based on denying them citizenship and basic human rights. This counter narrative recollects a history of exploitation against Black, Indigenous, and people of color, from cotton plantations to boarding schools and internment camps, to the current humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border 

Pilar Castillo is a Belizean-born artist based in Los Angeles, and proudly represents the Caribbean diaspora. She has dedicated twenty-years as an art practitioner and professional in the L.A. art community with a focus on public art. As a painter and illustrator, she applies handmade processes to design work ranging from publication to product design. In 2018 she ventured into entrepreneurship opening CastlePillar Design studio. Most notably designing artwork for the 2018 launch of LAX Terminal 1 for Los Angeles World Airports. Since 2017 she’s been a featured designer with the city’s LA Original brand. Pilar holds an M.F.A. from Otis College of Art and Design, a B.A. in World Arts and Cultures from UCLA’s School of Art & Architecture, and has completed field studies in Amsterdam, Belgium and Cuba. 

Passport

Digital hand-made passport with sound by "Jar of Files"

6:32 minutes

NFS