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The exhibition can be viewed virtually on this webpage, or in person by appointment only.   

Toolbox LA

9410 Owensmouth Ave

Chatsworth, Ca 91311

The Earth is the ground upon which we all stand, together in our differences.  It is an ever-shifting, politicized landscape of borders, exclusions and omissions, as well as shared terrain under pressing physical assault. This multigenerational and multicultural group of artists explore the reality of a shared planet that is humanity’s most divided territory and damaged common ground.

Curated by Suvan Geer and Sandra Mueller

October 3 - November 14, 2020

 

Kim Abeles

Mariona Barkus

Sharon Barnes

Pilar Castillo

Danielle Eubank

Samantha Fields

Eloisa Guanlao

Ann Isolde

Sant Khalsa

Meg Madison

Kaoru Mansour

Maryrose C. Mendoza

Sandra Mueller

Naida Osline

Pamela J. Peters

Sheila Pinkel

Sinan Leong Revell

She Votes/ Bonnie J. Smith

Stitch in Time/ Suvan Geer

Linda Vallejo

Gail Werner

 

Previous Events

 

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Kim Abeles

The hundred+ sky photographs for Shared Skies were collected through my journeys, from artists who participated while traveling, and international acquaintances through social media. Each sky is identified with the location and the name of the person who took the photograph and represent all seven continents plus the Arctic. For participating, each photographer was given an archival print that included their sky with twelve others.

 

As people look toward the sky each morning, through the day or each night, the “shared skies” speak to our connections. In a global sense, we can imagine an interrelatedness through a seamless sky and observe the effects of our environmental choices. From the Salt Flats of Bolivia to Grand Forks in the United States, and Maasai Mara, Kenya to Pine Ridge, Oglala Sioux Tribe, our skies portray the connected parts of our place on this earth.

Kim Abeles is an artist whose artworks explore biography, geography, feminism, and the environment. Her work speaks to society, science literacy, and civic engagement, creating projects with science and natural history museums, health departments, air pollution control agencies, National Park Service, and non-profits. In 1987, she innovated a method to create images from the smog in the air, and Smog Collectors brought her work to national and international attention. In 2019, she worked with Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow to create smog portraits of world leaders with quotes from climate summits. The National Endowment for the Arts funded two recent projects: a residency at the Institute of Forest Genetics where she focused on Resilience; and, Valises for Camp Ground: Arts, Corrections, and Fire Management in the Santa Monica Mountains in collaboration with Camp 13, a group of female prison inmates who fight wildfires. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation and Pollack-Krasner Foundation. Her work is in forty public collections including MOCA, LACMA, Berkeley Art Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and National Geospatial Intelligence Agency. Her process documents are archived at the Center for Art + Environment.

Legend of Shared Skies, 2012-2014

Archival ultrachrome prints of international skies

Identified by location and photographer

56" x 16”

$1200

Legend of Shared Skies, 2012-2014

Archival ultrachrome prints of international skies

Identified by location and photographer

56" x 16”

$1200

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Mariona Barkus

Earth is currently littered with more than a quarter million metric ton of highly radioactive waste. Over 90,000 metric tons are in the United States, stored at 121 sites in 35 states. “Monument For A Nuclear Dump” was inspired by Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository’s search for a system of surface markers to warn of its planned lethal underground cache for hundreds of thousands of years. A “toilet paper roll” encapsulating 32 years of newspaper clippings mimics the folly of this entombment while documenting ubiquitous nuclear waste proliferation. When I created this print in 1995, only the United States was planning an underground nuclear waste repository. Today, countries around the world subscribe to the “best practice” of isolating nuclear waste in deep geological repositories, which will be permanently sealed. But this “best practice” assumes a rather static geology instead of the living, breathing, shifting common ground that is our earth. 

Mariona Barkus has shown her work in solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States as well as internationally. Barkus’ work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Getty Research Institute, UCLA, Franklin Furnace Collection at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Yale University Art Museum, Long Beach Museum, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Carnegie-Mellon University, UC Berkeley, Houston Contemporary Art Museum, and Eastern Washington University among others. Her work has been reviewed in numerous catalogues and periodicals including The Los Angeles Times and Artweek. Some of the books featuring her work are Crossing Over: Feminism and Art of Social Concern by Arlene Raven; Other Visions, Other Voices by Paul Von Blum with a foreword by Lucy Lippard; Artists’ Books: A Critical Anthology and Sourcebook by The Visual Studies Workshop; From Site to Vision: the Woman’s Building in Contemporary Culture, edited by Sondra Hale and Terry Wolverton, and most recently, American Artists Against War 1935—2010 by David McCarthy, University of California Press.

Monument for A Nuclear Dump Installation

Archival digital print & nuclear waste newspaper clippings

20” x 14" print; 9.25” x 662' roll

$500 print only

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Sharon Barnes

My suspended work Milkman’s Flight was inspired by Toni Morrison’s book, Song of Solomon. Morrison wove a story in which the conflicted Milkman would finally know his forefather’s names and the inherited magic to free one’s mind and fly. The slave trade severed the memories of countless lineages and displaced African peoples from an entire continent. My work explores connections to earth and memory that are vital to the restoration of peace within each individual and among all people, as we seek to connect with one another on common ground.

Sharon Barnes is an inter-disciplinary Los Angeles-based artist born in Sacramento, CA, and raised in Los Angeles.  She studied at Otis College of Art & Design where she recently returned to complete her MFA in Fine Arts, and previously earned a BA in Television & Film from CSULA.  Barnes has exhibited nationally and internationally, including group shows at the California African American Museum, the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Aqua Art Miami, the Los Angeles Tom Bradley Airport and a site installation at the Arco Chato in the Republic of Panama. She has completed residencies at the Ox-Bow School of Art & Artist Residency in Saugatuck, MI and the Spelman College Art Colony at Taller Portobelo in Panama.  Barnes’ work is in the permanent collection of the UCLA Ralph Bunche Center for African American Studies, as well as private and business collections.

Milkman's Flight

Suspended sculpture

72" x 72" x 3"

$7000

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Pilar Castillo

Designed as a ‘hyper-real’ counterfeit, the PASSPORT booklet mimics the structure and subverts the content of the official document. This counterfeit travel document aims to confront the institutional narrative, question its authenticity, and serve as a record of protest and indignation. This work is centered within the context of ‘decolonizing design,’ as a practice in redefining how we interpret government narratives, and to consider the formats in which land is claimed and people discarded. 

PASSPORT revisits the political systems imposed by the U.S. government to exploit immigrants based on denying them citizenship and basic human rights. This counter narrative recollects a history of exploitation against Black, Indigenous, and people of color, from cotton plantations to boarding schools and internment camps, to the current humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border 

Pilar Castillo is a Belizean-born artist based in Los Angeles, and proudly represents the Caribbean diaspora. She has dedicated twenty-years as an art practitioner and professional in the L.A. art community with a focus on public art. As a painter and illustrator, she applies handmade processes to design work ranging from publication to product design. In 2018 she ventured into entrepreneurship opening CastlePillar Design studio. Most notably designing artwork for the 2018 launch of LAX Terminal 1 for Los Angeles World Airports. Since 2017 she’s been a featured designer with the city’s LA Original brand. Pilar holds an M.F.A. from Otis College of Art and Design, a B.A. in World Arts and Cultures from UCLA’s School of Art & Architecture, and has completed field studies in Amsterdam, Belgium and Cuba. 

Passport

Digital hand-made passport with sound by "Jar of Files"

6:32 minutes

NFS

Danielle Eubank

Common ground is the answer. In order to help mitigate climate change, which is what Antarctica Glacier II is about, we need to change the way we think about air, water, and earth to more fully embrace the understanding that we all share these elements, amongst all living things. Air, water, and earth are figuratively and literally our common ground.

 

Antarctica Ice I reflects how I feel at times. It is floating in the benign yet destructive sea. There is only one sea, one common ocean amongst all continents, all people, all life. The sea is our common ground yet, when viewed from our individual angles, it is easy to lose sight of the larger perspective. That piece of ice, no matter how big or small, is unaware that it is part of a greater whole

Danielle Eubank is a painter exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant. Eubank conceived One Artist Five Oceans, a 20-year project as an expedition artist sailing and painting the waters of every ocean on earth. Culminating with an expedition to Antarctica in 2019, the Southern Ocean was Eubank's fifth and final ocean. It capped her decades-long quest to paint every ocean to raise awareness about the state of the oceans and climate change. Eubank was the expedition artist for the Phoenicia Ship Expedition, a replica 600 BCE ship that sailed from Syria and circumnavigated Africa. As the expedition artist for the UNESCO approved Borobudur Ship Expedition, she traveled 10,000 miles aboard the replica 8th century Indonesian boat from Indonesia to Ghana. Eubank also sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship “The Antigua” to the High Arctic that sailed to the northernmost settlement on earth. She painted the Henley Royal Regatta in 2011-2014. A film documentary about her work, Mozambique VI, premiered at the Newport Beach Film Festival. She was a 2018 Creative Climate Award nominee and received the WCA/United Nations Program Honor Roll Award

Antartica Glacier III

Photograph printed on metal

30" x 20"

$1,600

Antartica Ice I

Photograph printed on metal

20" x 30"

$1,600

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Samantha Fields

 

In my current paintings, I use multiple sources to construct scenes that examine our current political situation and the death of the American Dream . . . itself a carefully constructed fiction. While half of our nation celebrates, the other half is mired in despair, this dissonance is present in all of my current work. 

 

The paintings in Common Ground depict man-man disasters: car bombs, acts of terrorism/war, & industrial explosions. In these paintings, I remove identifying information, only the explosions and smoke remain. These are painted against a background of confetti, which reads as both celebratory and destructive . . . the little bits of paper “flip”, becoming shards of debris and shrapnel. While most of my work deals with climate change as seen in the landscape itself, these works offer a corollary conversation surrounding the procurement of fossil fuels. Historically, landscape painting has been markedly political. In this sense, my work falls well within that tradition.

 

Samantha Fields was born in Cleveland Ohio in 1972. She holds an MFA from The Cranbrook Academy of Art and is currently a Professor of Art at California State University, Northridge. She has received numerous awards and recognition, including a City of Los Angeles (COLA) Individual Artist Grant. Her work has been collected by and exhibited at public institutions including the California Museum of Photography, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Crocker Art Museum, the University Art Museum, and the Armory Center for the Arts. She is represented by Traywick Contemporary in Berkeley, California. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Harpers Magazine, ZYZZYVA, Artweek, Art in America, Art ltd., Artillery, The Detroit News, The Detroit Free Press and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. A profile about Fields is included in Danielle Krysas book, A Big Important Book About Art: Now With Women! 

As Above, So Below

Acrylic on Paper

30" x 22"

$1800 unframed, $2300 framed

Elevations

Acrylic on Paper

30" x 22"

$1800 unframed, $2300 framed

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Eloisa Guanlao

 

Haiyan 2.0 revisits the frustratingly pernicious issue of habitat and species loss in the age of the anthropocene. Its manifestation as a canoe underscores our own undoing, from the loss of a way of life and home for island dwellers due to the rise of sea waters, from the building of dams that wreak havoc on the wild salmon population, to the extraction of minerals for personal computers and phones, the colonization and exploitation of our home continues unabated. The life-sized canoe is cast in edible rice paper. Lightly block-printed on each canoe are images of trilobites, an extinct species that once dominated the planet. Dancing alongside the trilobites is the Covid-19 virus. The canoe serves as a double-edged reminder of the tenuous benefits and pitfalls of technological dependence and ecological alterations. Canoes once served as the lifeblood of island dwellers for expanded colonization to other islands and gathering of sustenance, but like fragile island homes, the rice paper canoe will disappear when inundated by water.

 

Eloisa Guanlao is a multi-disciplinary artist and scholar. She attended Carleton College in Minnesota, California State University in Long Beach, the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and LA County High School for the Arts for her art and art history training. She currently makes her home in California with her husband and two daughters. Three threads converge in her artwork: migration, technological dependence, and colonialism. She finds that one thread inevitably runs into the other two, forming a muddled jumble that can only be sifted through and examined via art — a means of corporeal and spiritual survival.

Haiyan 2.0

Rice paper, ink

18" x 96" x 18"

NFS

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Ann Isolde

 

My paintings address the ongoing threat of Climate Change. I’ll never forget the famous “blue marble” photo taken during the Apollo 17 trip to the moon in 1972. It changed how I view our planet. It looked so beautiful and alive. That was two years after the first Earth Day celebration, which was the birth of the modern environmental movement. This is when it first became clear to me that we are just one of many interrelated species that share this common ground called earth. Unfortunately, since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, humans have become more and more addicted to fossil fuels, which are heating up the atmosphere and polluting the air and water. Now we must focus on “Climate Justice” and address environmental racism as we struggle to maintain a balance so all species on this planet can survive. This is the great challenge of our time.

 

Ann Isolde is a visual artist and activist who has been involved in the feminist art movement since 1973. She earned a BA from Knox College and an MFA from the University of Colorado. She subsequently joined Front Range Women in the Visual Arts in Boulder, Colorado. In 1975 she drove to Los Angeles to participate in the Feminist Studio Workshop at The Woman’s Building. Within a year, she began working with Judy Chicago on The Dinner Party Project as facilitator of the team that researched the achievements of 3,000 women in Western civilization. She was one of eight women who painted the 999 names in gold china paint on the “Heritage Floor” of this monumental sculpture now permanently installed at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. A member of SCWCA since 1981, she also worked as an administrator in Publications and Exhibitions at both LACMA and the Getty Research Institute before retiring in 2007. She is the editor of Personal Voices / Cultural Visions: Conversations in the Visual Arts Community, Los Angeles 1994-1996 published by the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art.

The Greenhouse Effect

Acrylic on canvas board

13" x 16"

NFS

Planet in Peril

Acrylic and paper on canvas board

11" x 14"

NFS

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Sant Khalsa

 

My artwork derives from mindful inquiry into environmental and societal issues impacting the shared natural resources essential to sustain all live. Growing Air focuses on hundreds of ponderosa pine trees I planted during Spring 1992 as part of the reforestation of Holcomb Valley in the San Bernardino National Forest to improve air and water quality and restore a fragile and vital ecosystem. The valley located north of Big Bear Lake was decimated by mining, clearcutting and cattle grazing during the 1860s gold rush. I returned to the site of the seedling plantings in 2017, twenty-five years later, to find an extraordinarily beautiful and thriving forest. I am fascinated with both what is visible and the hidden mysteries we seek to understand about trees and their communal lives. I am spending time in the forest, developing a meaningful connection and producing works that respond to this unique and complex environment.

 

Sant Khalsa is an artist, educator and activist whose photography, mixed media and installation works are widely exhibited, published, and acquired by museums including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Nevada Museum of Art, Center for Creative Photography in Tucson and UCR California Museum of Photography in Riverside. Khalsa is a recipient of prestigious fellowships, grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, California Arts Council, California Council for the Humanities, Center for Photographic Art in Carmel and others. She was honored as the inaugural recipient of the Society for Photographic Education Insight Award for her significant contributions to the field of photography (2012). Books have included Sant Khalsa: Prana - Life with Trees (Griffith Moon/MOAH Lancaster, 2019), In the Sunshine of Neglect (Inlandia Institute, 2018), Seismic Shift (UCR California Museum of Photography, 2011), Backyard Oasis (DelMonico Books, 2012), Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment (Skira/Rizzoli, 2011) and Art in Action: Nature, Creativity and Our Collective Future (Earth Aware Editions, 2007). Khalsa is a Professor of Art, Emerita at California State University, San Bernardino and the founding director of the Joshua Tree Center for Photographic Arts. 

Holcomb Valley (Gold rush remains & Ponderosa Pines planted 1992) from “Growing Air”

Archival pigment print

18.5" x 24”      

$1,500

Holcomb Valley (Ponderosa pines planted 1992)

from “Growing Air”

Archival pigment print

18.5" x 24”   $1,500

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Meg Madison

 

After my mother died, I bought a small house in the California High Desert; I am the third owner from the original 1957 recipient of the Homesteader Act. I began making cyanotype photograms of all the native plants on the five acres. I cataloged each print with the date, time, plant’s name, location, and day’s weather condition. Holding the piece of coated paper next to daggers of yucca, and spines of cactus as the sun exposed the paper brought me in direct contact with the plant, the earth and this land.  “No 179 Yucca Schidigera” was made August 7, 2017, 9:19 am, a sunny hot day in 4 minutes and 45 seconds. The left and bottom of the composition are flanked by bayonet-like plant stems, while the middle is an expanse of deep blue space; much like the expanse of the desert, and also a personal searching for grounding.

 

Meg Madison is an artist who uses photography to conceptually examine contemporary life. She was born and raised in New York City, studied film at San Francisco State and came to art late with her first solo exhibit at the Kristi Engle Gallery in 2005. Madison embraced art making with community projects, collaborations, and exhibitions in galleries, non-profit spaces, and museums in Los Angeles and beyond. Madison’s early work explored memory, ritual, and the ecological transition from being wanted to being discarded; this was followed by projects on land use, measuring, mapping and the human connection to the land. Jemez Homestead: Stolen Land is a long-term project using the sun to create cyanotype photograms that map a five-acre homestead parcel in the high desert. The paper is snuggled into shrubs and braced against desert plants- the elements of the sun, the wind, the iron salts, the physical presence of land ( the plants shadow) and finally the local well water to develop — all collide creating a print that has touched the land —leaving marks, holes, and scratches on the paper, a metaphor for the contact of land stewardship.. 

No 179 Mojave Yucca from “Jemez Homestead

“Stolen Land” Project

Cyanotype photogram of Yucca plant, Rives BFK paper 30” x 22”      

$600

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Kaoru Monsour

 

My landscape series started while I was traveling to South America, Asia, Europe and the U.S. I observed elements of different landscapes. For my art making process, all these landscapes are the communal ground for the inspiration of my work. 

 

Kaoru Mansour is a native of Japan working as a painter and musician in Los Angeles. She moved to California in 1986 and studied at Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles 1987-1989. Recent Selected solo shows include Heather James Fine Art in Palm Desert, Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia, En Gallery in Pasadena, ARK in Altadena and Plan D gallery in Los Angeles.  Recent selected group shows include USC Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena, El Camino College Gallery in Torrance and Vallo della in Lucania Municipality, Italy.

Portland #102

Inkjet print and acrylic on canvas

10" x 20"

$450

Foothill #103

Inkjet print and acrylic on canvas

10" x 20"

$450

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Maryrose Cobarrubias Mendoza

 

Global is a consequence of a longing for identity and place through the stereotypical colonial fantasy of "island life." Although the piece looks very inviting, for me it addresses the loss, extraction, and subjugation of island cultural life that is hidden in the popularization of the exotic and perpetuated by the colonized mind. 

 

Maryrose Cobarrubias Mendoza, an interdisciplinary artist and arts educator, has crafted her own visual language of transformation, exalting the everyday in drawings, sculpture, and installation for nearly 30 years. Using memory, material significance, and personal narrative, her work investigates colonized and decolonized perspectives reflecting circumstances of cultural amnesia and assimilation through processes of the handmade. Mendoza is an Associate Professor in Drawing in the Visual Arts and Media Studies Division at Pasadena City College and earned an MFA from the Claremont Graduate University. Her work has been exhibited at the Pacific Asia Museum, Los Angeles’ Municipal Art Gallery, Commonwealth and Council, Baik Art, Solway Jones, Hudson Jones Gallery, PlugIn Gallery, YYZ Artist’s Outlet, and many others. Her most comprehensive solo exhibition, Navigating Technics, is currently on display at the Orange County Museum of Art. Mendoza was honored as a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow (2019), and with C.O.L.A. Individual Artist, L. A. Artists’, and Art Matters Fellowships, as well as honorariums from the YYZ Artist’s Outlet, the PlugIn Gallery, and the Pacific Asia Museum. She has enjoyed internships and artist residencies at Art Space Yosuga in Kyoto, Japan, Joshua Tree Highlands Residency, Yaddo Artist Retreat and the Socrates Sculpture Foundation.

Global

32 Aloha shirts, filler

42" x 42' x 42"

NFS

Sandra Mueller

 

In Morning Chores two birds — who might be permanent residents or winter visitors to this once royal Indian forest — share the pictorial frame and colorful palette with a temple sweeper.  Their stance is one of calm repose that brings our attention to earth’s most precious resource, water. They are quietly at work to sustain their/our physical and spiritual presence on this planet. 

 

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and facilitator. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to visual art. Mueller has curated and directed environmental exhibitions for conferences, galleries and community art spaces. She has edited and produced more than 50 interactive media and print titles including multiple art catalogues. Mueller serves on the national board for the Women’s Caucus for Art and as a Regional Coordinator for The Feminist Art Project. Her colorful abstract paintings, archival eco-prints and installations have been shown broadly in the Pacific Rim region. In 2014, she co-created a twelve-foot wide “Dome of Many Connections” as a gathering place for an international art exchange in Shenyang China. She received her BA from UC Berkeley in intellectual history and found her way to visual art two decades later. Now she presents her concepts visually and keeps a studio practice in Santa Monica, CA.

Morning Chores

Archival acrylic print

16" x 39"

NFS

Naida Osline

 

We humans often create geographic, cultural, economic, racial, age and gender borders that prevent us from seeing our common ground. GRINGOTOPIA began in the summer of 2015, when I rented an apartment off the malecón in Chapala, Mexico, a magnet for expatriates. I interviewed 25 citizens from Mexico, the U.S. and Canada—retirees, businesspeople, drifters, veterans, artists, and workers who left the U.S. for Mexico in search of a better quality of life. The results were twelve, ten-minute video chapters, featuring interwoven interviews, paced like a social conversation. 

 

I have a heightened awareness of the cultural divisions that are tearing this country and friendships apart. Political rhetoric does not represent the subtlety of human experience. Rather, relationships follow a more organic path in real life. GRINGOTOPIA offers a look at individuals who voice intimate and often humorous observations about their life-changing move across more than just a geographic border.

 

Naida Osline is a photo and video artist who combines images sourced from analog and digital processes, blending conceptual and documentary practices. Based in Southern California, she works throughout the Americas, exploring themes of community, identity, gender, aging and transformation, along with the mystical and natural worlds in tension with the human-built environment. Osline’s work has been in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout Southern California and internationally. She has done extended residencies in Colombia, SA and Mexico as well as in U.S. national parks. Her work has been reviewed in the Los Angeles Times, Artillery Magazine, Huffington Post, the OC Weekly, Culture Magazine, Coast Magazine, Artweek and ArtScene. The gallery features a screening of a series of twelve, ten-minute video shorts that comprise Gringotopia (2018), which explores an area south of Guadalajara in Mexico that is a magnet for expatriates from the U.S. and Canada, who moved there for a better quality of life. The video series, seen by over 8,000 viewers worldwide, includes English and Spanish subtitles. Osline’s most recent project is a feature length film (with Tyler Stallings) called Hometown Proud (2020) that explores attitudes related to growing up LGBTQ.

Gringotopia

Digital video

12, 10 minute chapters

Free to the Public

 Purchase Inquiry

Pamela J. Peters

 

The Legacy of Exiled NDNZ © 2014 series discusses the historical U.S. policy of the relocation of Indians to urban establishment in the 1950s through the 1960s, and the legacy it has created through today. It provides a narrative of seven native adults currently living in Los Angeles, shot in a neorealist visual aesthetic reminiscent of Kent Mackenzie’s 1961 film, The Exiles. This photo was taken at Los Angeles Union Station. 

 

Pamela J. Peters is a Diné multimedia documentarian and artist from the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. Pamela is from the Táchii'nii (Red Running Into the Water People clan). She is a multimedia artist, producing works she regards as "Indigenous Realism" exploring the lives and diversities of real American Indians.  As an artist and curator, she pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media through a Native lens while expressing creative sovereignty.  She lives in Los Angeles.

Welcome to Los Angeles

Black and white photograph

22" x 18"

$1,800

Walking in Indian Alley

Black and white photograph

22" x 18"

$1,800

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Sheila Pinkel


The work “Transformative Justice” reflects a way of understanding every person as a whole person and a process of solving problems between people instead of calling the police. In this approach to problem solving, people having problems are called to a meeting with a facilitator and members of their families and the community. The facilitator helps them discuss their conflict with the goal of creating understanding of the positions of both people. Ultimately, the person who has been wronged communicates what he/she feels will be adequate restitution. If the person who has committed the problem cannot afford the restitution, then a member of his/her family steps up to help. The community then discusses what it can do to help people having these kinds of problems in the future so that a person does not have to commit a crime. This is the indigenous way of adjudicating problems in their community.

Sheila Pinkel is an artist whose work makes visible the invisible in nature and culture. Currently she is working on carceral issues both in her artwork and in her proactive cultural work in an attempt to create consciousness about the pernicious carceral state locally and in the United States. She is also an emerita professor of art from Pomona College where she taught photography and computer graphics for over 25 years.

Transformative Justice

Digital print

24" x 24"

$500

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